About / Frequently asked questions

What is the role of the Greyhound Welfare and Integrity Commission?
When do the industry's regulatory functions transfer from GRNSW to the Commission?
What is the Commission responsible for?
What is GRNSW responsible for?
Why was the Commission set up?
Is the Commission a Government agency?
What happens to my current registration/s on 1 July 2018?
How do I register my greyhound, or register as a breeder or trainer after 1 July 2018?
Do I have to register my trial track?
When will the enhanced registration requirements start?
When will the new Racing Rules be ready?
What are Body Worn Cameras (BWC)?
Why has the Commission introduced BWC’s?
What are the benefits of BWC’s to industry participants?
When can the BWCs be used?
How will the BWC recordings be stored?
How will my privacy be protected?
What powers do the Commission's Inspectors have to wear a BWC?
Does my inspection have to be recorded?
When will the Commission start using BWCs?
How do I report the conduct of an Inspector or other Commission official?

What is the role of the Greyhound Welfare and Integrity Commission?

The Greyhound Welfare and Integrity Commission is responsible for promoting and protecting the welfare of greyhounds, safeguarding the integrity of greyhound racing and betting, and maintaining public confidence in the greyhound racing industry.

When do the industry’s regulatory functions transfer from GRNSW to the Commission?

On 1 July 2018 the Commission took over the welfare and regulatory functions from Greyhound Racing NSW (GRNSW). GRNSW retained the commercial functions for the industry.

What is the Commission responsible for?

  • Control and regulate greyhound racing
  • Administer the Greyhound Racing Rules
  • Register greyhounds and industry participants (including but not limited to owners, breeders, trainers and bookmakers)
  • Investigate animal welfare and integrity concerns relating to greyhound racing in NSW
  • Employ race stewards and inspectors

What is GRNSW responsible for?

  • Register greyhound racing clubs
  • Develop safety standards for registered racecourses
  • Manage greyhound re-homing programs (e.g. Greyhounds As Pets)
  • Distribute industry funding received from the TAB
  • Provide funding for the Commission

Why was the Commission set up?

The Commission was set up to manage the regulatory functions of the industry following a report released by the Greyhound Industry Reform Panel in February 2017.
The report recommended changes be made including separating the commercial and regulatory functions of GRNSW to help build the community’s confidence in the industry.

Is the Commission a Government agency?

The Commission is a NSW Government agency although is not subject to the control and direction of the Minister except to the extent expressly provided for under the Greyhound Racing Act 2017, or any other Act.

What happens to my current registration/s from 1 July 2018?

On 1 July 2018, current GRNSW registrations of greyhounds, industry participants and trial tracks were ‘rolled over’ to the Commission free of charge for a 12 month period. Only new registrations will be charged registration fees (if applicable) during this period.

How do I register my greyhound, or register as a breeder or trainer after 1 July 2018?

Registrants can access all registration forms via the forms page on our website.

Do I have to register my trial track?

Yes, from 1 July 2018 all new trial tracks must be registered. GRNSW registrations current at 30 June 2018 were rolled over until 30 June 2019.

When will the enhanced registration requirements start?

Additional registration requirements will be introduced for all current and new registrants within the first 12 months, from 1 July 2018. Competency training will be designed to accommodate current and future industry participants.

When will the new Racing Rules be ready?

The current Greyhound Racing Rules will be administered until new racing rules are developed by the Commission, by 30 June 2019.

What are Body Worn Cameras (BWC)?

BWCs are a clearly visible, overt recording device used to record any interaction a Commission inspector has with any member of the industry or public.

Why has the Commission introduced BWCs?

Following feedback received from the industry, the cameras are being introduced to ensure a high level of service is provided by GWIC, and ensure inspectors are accountable for their actions. The cameras will also ensure the safety of inspectors and participants.

What are the benefits of BWCs to industry participants?

  • they provide an un-editable record of interactions between inspectors and participants
  • they provide an opportunity to analyse the performance of inspectors in the field and identify areas where performance can be improved.

When can the BWCs be used?

Commission inspectors will only use the BWCs during inspections and approved activities. Inspections are to be recorded from start to finish (i.e. from the time inspectors arrive at a property, until they depart).

There are some circumstances within this scope where recording on the BWC should be stopped / not take place. This includes in places where a reasonable expectation of privacy exists e.g. changing rooms, toilets etc. or in other circumstances when the inspectors reasonably believe it would be inappropriate to make a video recording.

In circumstances where the recording is re-commenced, the inspector must clearly state the reason for the suspension and that the recording has been recommenced. If the recording was suspended in the presence of a participant(s) they will be given the opportunity to add to the record anything that occurred during the suspension. For example: Inspector X will ask, “Is there anything that occurred during the suspension of the recording that you want noted for the record?”

How will the BWC recordings be stored?

The BWC video is stored in an electronic system. Each file is protected by passwords which are changed regularly. The files can only be accessed by the inspector and their managers.

How will my privacy be protected?

BWC images and recordings may capture personal information. The collection, management and release of personal information are regulated by the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 and accountable to the Information and Privacy Commissioners.

What powers do Commission inspectors have to wear a BWC?

There are two authorities in the Greyhound Racing Act 2017 that permit the use of body worn cameras:

  1. section 75(2)(d) – An inspector may take such photographs, films, audio, video and other recordings as the inspector considers necessary on a premises that has been lawfully entered.
  2. section 80 - An inspector may cause any questions and answers to questions given to be recorded using sound recording apparatus or audio visual apparatus, or any other method. There are two requirements to recording questions and answers:
  • the person who is to be questioned must be advised that a record is to be made, and
  • a copy of the record must be provided by the inspector to the person as soon as practicable after it is made if requested by the person and if the Commission determine that it is in the public interest and/or does not infringe the Commission's requirement to comply with privacy legislation.

Does my inspection have to be recorded?

A recording can be made even when the participant objects to the recording. Under these authorities, there is no obligation to stop recording because a person does not wish to have a BWC operating. If a person maintains an objection to being recorded, they will be provided the Chief Inspector’s details to submit a further objection or complaint.

When will the Commission start using BWCs?

The use of BWCs commenced from Monday 16 July 2018.

How do I report the conduct of an inspector or other Commission official?

Participants can submit a formal complaint via the online 'Report a concern' form. All complaints received are assessed and taken seriously regardless of their nature. Complainants will be contacted upon receipt (unless they submit a complaint anonymously) and advised of the outcome of their complaint. Complainants are encouraged to provide as much detail as possible and their contact details.